Search results for “Colour films in britain the negotiation of innovation 1900 1955 bfi tv classics”

Colour Films in Britain: The Negotiation of Innovation 1900-1955How did the coming of colour change the British film industry? Unlike sound, the arrival of colour did not revolutionise the industry overnight. For British film-makers and enthusiasts, colour was a controversial topic. While it was greeted by some as an exciting development – with scope for developing a uniquely British aesthetic – others were deeply concerned. How would audiences accustomed to seeing black-and-white films – which were commonly regarded as being superior to their garish c…

Pretend You're In A War: The Who and the Sixties“A definitive tome for both Who fans and newcomers alike” – Q Magazine Pete Townshend was once asked how he prepared himself for The Who’s violent live performances. His answer? ‘Pretend you’re in a war.’ For a band as prone to furious infighting as it was notorious for acts of ‘auto-destructive art’ this could have served as a motto. Between 1964 and 1969 The Who released some of the most dramatic and confrontational music of the decade, including ‘I Can’t Explain’, ‘My Generation’ and ‘I Can…

Elisabeth Sladen: The AutobiographyA unique, insider’s view of the world’s longest-running science fiction series, from one of the fans’ favorite companions. David Tennant’s foreword caps this warm, witty memoir—a fitting tribute to a woman who will be sadly missed by legions of fans. When Elisabeth Sladen first appeared as plucky journalist Sarah Jane Smith in 1973 Doctor Who story “The Time Warrior,” little did she know the character would become one of the most enduring and fondly remembered in the series’ history. Here s…

Colour Films in Britain: The Negotiation of Innovation 1900-1955 by Street, Sarah published by British Film Institute (2012)A unique, insider’s view of the world’s longest-running science fiction series, from one of the fans’ favorite companions. David Tennant’s foreword caps this warm, witty memoir—a fitting tribute to a woman who will be sadly missed by legions of fans. When Elisabeth Sladen first appeared as plucky journalist Sarah Jane Smith in 1973 Doctor Who story “The Time Warrior,” little did she know the character would become one of the most enduring and fondly remembered in the series’ history. Here s…

In Plain Sight: The Life and Lies of Jimmy SavileDan Davies has spent more than a decade on a quest to find the real Jimmy Savile, and interviewed him extensively over a period of seven years before his death. In the course of his quest, he spent days and nights at a time quizzing Savile at his homes in Leeds and Scarborough, lunched with him at venues ranging from humble transport cafes to the Athenaeum club in London, and, most memorably, joined him for a short cruise aboard the QE2. Dan thought his quest had come to an end in October 2011 w…

Smiling in Slow MotionWritten between May 1991 and February 1994, and ending just two weeks before his death from an AIDS-related illness, Derek Jarman’s entries in Smiling in Slow Motion pick up where Modern Nature left off. Friends and enemies are reviewed as he races through his last years painting, filmmaking, gardening, and annoying his targets through his involvement in radical politics. Infused throughout with familiar honesty and wry humor, Smiling in Slow Motion is a document of endeavor, remembrance, and …

[(Colour Films in Britain: The Negotiation of Innovation 1900-1955 )] [Author: Sarah Street] [Nov-2012]Written between May 1991 and February 1994, and ending just two weeks before his death from an AIDS-related illness, Derek Jarman’s entries in Smiling in Slow Motion pick up where Modern Nature left off. Friends and enemies are reviewed as he races through his last years painting, filmmaking, gardening, and annoying his targets through his involvement in radical politics. Infused throughout with familiar honesty and wry humor, Smiling in Slow Motion is a document of endeavor, remembrance, and …

Colour Films in Britain: The Negotiation of Innovation 1900-1955 (BFI TV Classics) by Sarah Street (2012-11-27)Written between May 1991 and February 1994, and ending just two weeks before his death from an AIDS-related illness, Derek Jarman’s entries in Smiling in Slow Motion pick up where Modern Nature left off. Friends and enemies are reviewed as he races through his last years painting, filmmaking, gardening, and annoying his targets through his involvement in radical politics. Infused throughout with familiar honesty and wry humor, Smiling in Slow Motion is a document of endeavor, remembrance, and …

Cinemas in Britain: A History of Cinema ArchitectureDespite an uneven history in terms of its popularity, the cinema continues to play an important role in British culture and cinema buildings are a vital part of communities across the country. This fascinating book is a comprehensive examination of the history of the cinema building in Britain, from its 19th-century origins right up to the present day. The earliest cinemas were little more than shop conversions or basic rectangular rooms. However, as popularity of film-going grew in the World Wa…

The Hammer StoryFifty years ago, Hammer Films released The Curse of Frankenstein. The now-legendary British company went on to make such classics as Dracula (and its many sequels), making international stars out of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee, changing the face of horror cinema, and inspiring a generation of Hollywood filmmakers, including George Lucas, Martin Scorsese and Tim Burton.Now, for the first time, Hammer have given their active backing to an authorised history of the company, and have provided…